McCloy Communities Public Art

With over four decades of experience in the residential sector, McCloy Group has established a significant presence in the Hunter and New England regions and is proud to be associated with some of the most popular residential communities in NSW.

One element that McCloy Group stands unrivalled in is their dedication to public art – used to enhance the living environment of residents in their communities. It’s truly an uncompromising quality that makes these award-winning communities stand apart from the rest.

“Public art is a display in the public domain that has been planned, executed and given back to the community for all to enjoy,” says Managing Director Brian Swaine. “We want to ensure McCloy Communities are more than just somewhere to build, so each community is individually masterplanned to enhance public open space and the enjoyment of those who live there. The public art throughout McCloy Communities is an ever growing credit to this.”

Public Art has a strong presence in McCloy Communities from the very start. For example, at Potter’s Lane at Raymond Terrace a sculpture of 2 clay pots is in the process of being erected as a signature piece in the neighbourhood park.

“We want to show residents that we go beyond their expectations and so these public art pieces are worked into the living space before the residents themselves are even there. Once complete, these pots will stand 3 meters tall and pay homage to the history of Raymond Terrace, predominantly first settler James King who became well known for his pottery,” Mr. Swaine said.

What distinguishes public art is the unique association between how it’s made, what it means and where it’s located. Throughout McCloy Communities the pieces seek to illustrate community values and embed a sense of pride in the space in which the residents live…in essence, they are a common community expression.

Within Billy’s Lookout at Teralba, you’ll find a range of public art associated with its location. A boastful cockatoo and two giant pelicans greet you as you enter as well as nautical displays which include pieces titled ‘Undercurrent’ and ‘Anchored,’ demonstrate Billy’s Lookout’s relaxed lifestyle – where the sea meets the bush. Two Billy goats are soon to be added, tying Billy’s Lookout back to the name originally given to the site by locals – Billy Goat Hill.

“The process of public art selection within McCloy Communities is aided by an expression of contemporary culture. We seek out imaginative pieces that complement the community they’ll be displayed in, creating a positive affinity between artist and community ” Mr. Swaine said.

Heritage Parc, Maitland is home to another formidable collection. Airborne swans at the entrance immediately resonate with the “parc life” that Heritage Parc provides, this continues throughout the neighbourhood with wooden day beds positioned by the pond for enjoyment and the twelve water reads titled ‘Waterways’. All of these pieces relate back to the strong presence of nature and open space living. Each piece is part of the neighbourhoods evolving history and the resident’s collective memory of their growing neighbourhood.

In Medowie, the recent housing boom has indeed been felt at The Bower, with 52 homesites sold since launch in September 2016. For a community very early in the development lifecycle, it too will be faithful to the McCloy name and contain a captivating display of public art. ‘Signed’ a piece by Victorian artist Jonathan Leahey represents cynical reality, leaving room for simple and spontaneous creativity. It’s a credit to future residents of The Bower, a place in which they too can spontaneously create their dream homes.

The message behind the piece links back to the nature of the Bower Bird, a free-spirited creature who’s known to build impressive homes. Bower Birds meticulously maintain their nests throughout the year beautifully decorating them with bright blue objects. Complementary to this is the Bower Bird piece found at the entrance creating a proud vibe from the moment you enter the neighbourhood.

Looking at the New England regions, again public art is a key contributer to the communities. The Foothills in Armidale features a piece entitled ‘Dust’, it appears as dust pouring from a clenched fist and is a symbol of landscape through time. What we touch we have the ability to create great things from, an outcome wished upon residents of The Foothills.

Lampada, Tamworth has a prominent display at the entrance to the neighbourhood, ‘Balancing the Books’ are a symbol of a balanced life that Lampada offers residents. The balance of being conveniently located close to everyday necessities but being far enough away for residents to enjoy the space and openness of the country. Again tying the art back to the community expression of each individual neighbourhood!

If you’re looking for land, be sure to take a look at the McCloy Communities throughout Port Stephens and the Hunter. These master planned residential communities are little pockets of paradise suited for all stages of life – and you’ll enjoy being part of your own art gallery as well!

Source: InTouch Magazine, April 2017

27 March 2017|